Smartphone controlled paper planes

Kickstarters are a rage. So are smartphone controlled projects.

Powerup combines these to create smartphone controlled paper planes. Check out the video – technology is pretty neat.

But to me this is ridiculous, while dealing with paper planes part of fun (at least for me) is not knowing where or for how long it will fly.

Powerup destroys my paper-plane joy.

Re-focus after taking a picture : New Apple patent

Apple is on a patent run.

Today on 9to5mac:

A patent granted to Apple today for a Light Field camera – a camera with zero shutter delay and where the focus point can be changed after taking the photo – covers the precise technology Steve Jobs told biographer Walter Isaacson he wanted to use to “reinvent photography.”

When the iPhone 5s came out with dual tone flash, it was a face-punch to the traditional digital cameras because it did something beyond what they offered.

And now this. This is way way beyond what they offer. This can be the knockout punch, at least for the lower end digital cameras.

Mac Apps Potpourri : 1

Mac Apps Potpourri is a series which will show how I use different apps in conjunction to save time and heart-ache from guilt of not utilising the mac to its fullest.

For the first episode of what can become a very long saga, I will be using combination of Picatext, Alfred, Safari and BetterTouchTool.

Now and then there always comes time when you cannot copy text from the screen. And all you want is to copy it and google search it. Or you want to copy it, add something extra to it and then google search it. Now take a moment and think what steps do you follow. Does it involve cumbersome app switching and violent typing? Take a look at the gif below (download it to view in full resolution) to find out my way and if you are interested then read on.


  1. I activate Picatext by my trackpad gesture, pre-assigned by me via BetterTouchTool.
  2. I take screenshot with Picatext. The app converts the screen capture into text and saves it into my clipboard. (Read my review of Picatext.)
  3. Now I call the Alfred window with my trackpad gesture, pre-assigned by me via BetterTouchTool.
  4. I use the gesture for paste (assigned by me via BetterTouchTool).
  5. Then from the drop-down Alfred menu I select the kind of search that I want or press the gesture for enter for google search.
  6. Wait for Safari to load my page as I take time to once again gloat at awesome things my mac can do.

A quick macro for closing multiple Safari tabs

As every sane person, when I dive into some topic the biggest toll is on the number of Safari browser tabs. When I am finished with the topic, I end up with a bunch of tabs. To get back to a clean-slate Safari I have to open new tab, switch back to the old tabs and close them one by one1. For me this was a hassle and that means it was a problem too big to ignore.

So, as always, I took KeyboardMaestro's help.

I prepared a macro that does a very nifty thing. When I hit my pre-assigned hot key, all the tabs are magically closed and at the end of the process a new tab remains waiting for my whims.

Pretty neat, right?

Check out the macro for yourself by downloading it from here.

Check out the gif for a visual example.

safari tab closing

PS – I will be posting macros now and then so make sure to subscribe for updates.

PPS – If anyone has some kind of hiccup in their workflow, trust me KeyboardMaestro has the answer. If you can't figure out the macro creation for yourself just give me a shout out on twitter or via the contact page of this blog. I will be happy to create and post the solution for you. Maybe someone else would also benefit from it. Cheers.

  1. I use all mac apps in fullscreen mode. So getting out of that full screen, hitting the red button to close the entire window, hitting cmd+N and again going full screen is out of the question.

The Red Mac Pro

As you may have heard, special edition Mac Pro designed for the Product (RED) program was sold in auction at a staggering $977,000.

Appleinsider reports:

The nearly $1 million dollar winning bid makes the Mac Pro the most expensive desktop PC ever built or sold, a wide margin ahead of novelty machines created by Japan's Zeus Computer, built from platinum and gold, with moldings embedded with diamonds and priced up toward $750,000.

Now, according to me, this goes on to show that design trumps pompousness.